A Taste of Trends

The UAE Art Scene: Challenges and Opportunities

The cultural scene in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has witnessed a dramatic shift over the past few decades, marked by rapid development of art initiatives, institutions, auction houses, galleries, and creative hubs. The country’s annual art fair, biennale, and a number of large-scale international partnerships have also garnered it global recognition. However, amidst this very fast progress, an important question arises in regards to the art scene’s connection to local communities and audiences, and its critical acknowledgement and representation of earlier artistic histories within the Emirates and the region. Have some of these art initiatives developed in relative isolation from the public and bypassed their needs and realities, catering instead to a select smaller audience? It is also important to consider, in the context of these rapid and ongoing developments, the longer histories of artistic practices in the region and cultivate a study and recognition of possible continuities, rather than only focus on building anew. This presentation will question the trajectory of the UAE’s cultural development, and address possible tactics of making its art sector more accessible and inclusive. via

Reopening culture in world cities: adapting to the new reality

Cultural venues are introducing a huge range of distancing and hygiene measures – from managing visitor routes and extending opening hours to installing screens and new ventilation systems. While it is often national governments determining the rules, cities have a vital role to play in interpreting the regulations, and providing guidance for their local context and needs of the sector. The Cities of Vienna and Los Angeles have worked directly with public health departments to launch guidelines for cultural venues with extensive sector consultation. via

After a Dip, the Market for Gerhard Richter’s Work Is Back on Solid Footing. Here’s Which Bodies of Work Are Thriving

Despite the fact that the trade in large Richter abstracts has slowed down a bit, the overall market is still going strong, albeit at a lower level, numerous auction experts and advisors said.

 

At Phillips’s recent major summer auction, a picture titled Abstraktes Bild (801-3) (1994) hammered at just over $3 million, a hair above its high estimate. (With fees, it went for $3.7 million.)

 

Since the sale, there have been two more private Richter sales for similar works and at similar prices, says Jean-Paul Engelen, Phillips’s deputy chairman.

 

But in the past, when demand has risen and driven up estimates, activity has intensified. “Then you hit the point where it breaks, and you have to restart about 20 percent lower. Now it feels very solid again,” Engelen says. via

Venice Biennale 2012

© 2012, by Naoya Hatakeyama 

Established in 1895, the Venice Biennale continues to be one of the most respected cultural institutions. Initially launched as an International Art Exhibition, the Biennale eventually expanded into other areas such as music, cinema, theatre, architecture, and dance.

The Architecture Exhibition, one that I follow closely, was launched in 1980. It is one of the most important event on the architectural calendar. This year, David Chipperfield was appointed as the Director and Curator for the Architecture Exhibition. The exhibition titled Common Ground will present 69 projects, with participants from the likes of Toyo Ito (Awarded Best Pavilion 2012 for his Japan Pavilion shown in the image above)

David Chipperfield speaks about Common Ground:

“We began by asking a limited group of architects to develop ideas that might lead to further invitations: everyone was asked to propose a project along with a dialogue that reacted to the theme and showed architecture in its context of influence and affinity, history and language, city and culture.

 

We want to emphasise the common ground that the profession shares, notwithstanding the apparent diversity of today’s architectural production. The sharing of differences is critical to the idea of an architectural culture.”

The exhibition is open until 25 November 2012.

Tim Walker: Story Teller

© 2012, by Tim Walker and Mulberry

Tim Walker said

“the camera is simply a box put between you and what you want to capture.”

The person behind the camera, Tim Walker, has developed a distinct aesthetic to orchestrate and capture the whimsical images that he produces. From Tim Walker’s Official Website, the creative man is also making moving film now after working with stills for 15 years. His first short film, The Lost Explorer recently won best short film at the Chicago United Film Festival.

Tim Walker’s status as a fashion photographer began when he was only 25, where he shot his first fashion story for Vogue. Since then, Tim Walker’s long term affair with the fashion magazine include images for British, Italian and American Vogue editions. One of his unmistakable trademarks, the experimentation with size of objects is again present in his 2012 Autumn/Winter ad campaign for British brand, Mulberry (shown in the above image).

During release of his book Pictures in 2008, Tim Walker had his first major exhibition in London. The photographer had since won many awards including the Infinity Award from the International Center of Photography in New York.

October 2012 marks another exhibition of Tim Walker, self-titled Tim Walker: Story Teller at Somerset House at the city of his residence – London. A book titled Story Teller to include 175 images, collages and snapshots will also be published to coincide with the exhibition. The exhibition runs from 12 October 2012 to 27 January 2013. For more information on the upcoming exhibition, visit Somerset House’s page for the exhibition.

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